Tag Archives: Iceland

Knitting in Iceland

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The reason I went to Iceland was because I received a grant to help me improve my teaching by incorporating art and physical education in the classroom. I found a program through Knitting Iceland that had knitting workshops, design workshops, and yoga and dance classes. Perfect.

Turns out the sheep population in Iceland is larger than the human population, so I was able to visit with lots of the fuzzy creatures.

sheep

I also had the opportunity to learn about dyeing yarn with natural, plant-based dyes.

dyeing

I spent a lot of time knitting and admiring the pieces that others made.

knitting

Traditional Icelandic sweaters, or lopapeysa, are a solid color for most of the sleeves and body, but have a multi-colored, intricately designed yoke. Like this one, that was for sale at the Handknitting Association of Iceland.

lopapeysa

I got to learn how to make one of these by creating a tiny version in a workshop that taught top-down sweater construction.

minisweater

For this project, I did my one and only steek (for you non-knitters, this means cutting into knit fabric, which also strikes fear into the hearts of many knitters) in order to make the front opening on this mini-sweater. I knit it in the round, then reinforced the edges in order for it to get cut open without unraveling. I conquered that fear, but it would still be nerve wracking for me to do this to a full-sized garment.

Overall, the trip was great. The grant was valuable. I learned new techniques, and I got inspired. What more can you ask for?

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Yes, sir, it’s a geyser

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The word geyser comes from the Icelandic word geysir, which means to gush, and is the name of one of the first discovered and recorded geysers.

geysir

Unfortunately, Geysir doesn’t erupt much any more, but Strokkur, which is nearby, still erupts frequently. I was there for only about 25 minutes, and got to see it happen four times!

geyser

It was impressive, to say the least.

geyser2

There are pools and puddles of near-boiling water all around the area. This geothermal heat is a huge energy source throughout Iceland. It smells a bit like sulfur, but it warms homes, provides hot water for showers, pools, and hot tubs, and melts snow when its pumped under roads. Pretty cool, er, warm.